Are the outgoings that you are paying actually due?

Are the outgoings that you are paying actually due?

 

 

 

Its quite common for outgoings to be charged by landlords in addition to rent, the amount charged varies from lease to lease.

 

Some landlords will pass on charges like business rates, land tax, strata fees etc and some charge for many more items related to the building in which your business operates.

 

Many people believe that if outgoings are listed in the lease then they have to be paid but this is not the case. Changes to the Retail Leases Act in July 2017 mean that if outgoings are not listed in the Disclosure Document then the landlord cannot legally charge you for them.

 

 

What is a disclosure document?

When you were looking to take over the premises you should have been given a copy of this document (via your solicitor). The disclosure document is basically a summary of the key points of the lease, the document is given to you so that you can be sure that you know what you are signing for.

 

 

 

How Lucas just reduced his annual outgoings by $5,000 per year.

 

I was recently looking through a lease for a client, Lucas, to help him work out the potential value of his business when I noticed that the level of outgoings seemed quite high.

Lucas was not entirely sure what the outgoings that he paid monthly actually covered so the first thing we did was get the managing agent to send through an itemised invoice for all charges.

 

Looking through the lease along with the invoice for the outgoings we noticed that although the amounts charged seemed to match what was stated in the lease some of the charges did not appear on the disclosure document.

 

In addition to this the landlord had also miscalculated the way in which the land tax was being calculated.

 

I asked Lucas to contact his solicitor to check this and he confirmed what we had found and followed up with the landlord’s agent with the letter below.
Without going into too much detail the outcome resulted in a reduction of just over $5000 per year in outgoings and a rebate of the over payment since the lease was signed, not a bad result!

 

If you are currently paying your outgoings without being 100% sure what they cover it may well be worth checking.
Here is what you should do:

 

✅ Ask your agent or landlord for an itemised breakdown of what the outgoings on the rent invoice actually cover.

✅ If you do not have a copy ask the solicitor that acted for you when you signed the lease for a copy of the disclosure document.

✅ Make sure that all of the charges on the invoice are listed on the disclosure document and that the amounts being charged match up (allowing for declared annual increases).

✅If you find any differences then it may well be worth double checking these with your solicitor.

 

This whole exercise took Lucas only a few hours and resulted in a refund, a reduction of ongoing costs and a more saleable and valuable business. The $5000 saved per year drops straight into the overall profit of the business which ultimately will help to increase the value.

 

I hope that this inspires you to double check your own outgoings, good luck and let me know if you have any questions about this.

 

If you would like to have a confidential chat about your business anytime feel free to book in a time that suits you here https://www.gsebusinessconsultants.com.au/apply

 

How to Calculate Your Food Cost Percentage

How to Calculate Your Food Cost Percentage

 

 

 

 

Video Transcript.

 

Following on from the menu costing spreadsheet that we sent out recently or you may have downloaded with regard to working out what your food cost percentage is, I’ve had a couple of questions from people about asking “how can we work out what our current food cost percentage is based off the P&L?”

 

So in this quick video I’m going to walk you through a very easy calculation to work out where your current food cost percentage is, and show you how you can then take that and work out what your current cost of goods is as well.

 

Two fairly important metrics that you should be looking at all the time, although there are quicker ways of doing it than going through the P&L, this is a good way of looking at it.

 

The thing to bear in mind with this is if there’s cash coming out of the business, you need to have a record of that. You need to know how much has come out in order to add it back into the figures that you’re taking from the P&L to give you a true figure. So if you don’t have a record of that, I suggest you start keeping one or keep track of it so you can really have a clear idea of exactly how the business is doing. Otherwise you’re kind of flying blind.

 

We do have another spreadsheet that we use for that so if that’s something that’s of interest to you, just post in the comments below and we’ll make sure that we get one of those out to you. And there is a video accompanying that as well, just to walk you through how you can track all of the expenses and all of the income, cash and otherwise, to make sure you know exactly where your cafe’s at at any one time with those key metrics.

 

 

So moving on then, looking at the food cost percentage from the P&L perspective. For the purpose of this we’re going to be using this column here, so the actual June 18 column. And down here, what we’re going to do basically is we’re going to go through and from this, to start with, we’re going to be looking at what was the income?

 

What’s the net income for the business for the period that we’re looking at? So we’re going to take every line here, so the main sales line here. In addition to those you can see on this particular P&L there’s income from Uber and Menulog and so on, so we’re going to include that. We’re going to add all of those up.

 

 

Once we’ve done that, we’re going to look at what was the food cost in relation to generating those sales. And you can see there, in the cost of sales column there, we’ve got cost of goods, food combined, and also cost of goods sold. So that doesn’t necessarily need to be on two lines. It’s just the way that these people have decided to run things through for their accounting purposes. But it could all be under one line.

 

 

Basically what you’re looking for here is what were the food costs involved in generating the income in the top line. So once you’ve got those numbers, it’s just really a case of taking that number.

 

How to Calculate Food Cost Percentage

 

So to work out what the total food costs were and then you’re going to divide that by the net sales, what the total net sales were, and that was from both of those rows previously. That will give you a percentage figure or a figure here of 0.3567. You then multiply that by 100. It’ll give you 35.67. And that will then show you that your food cost is at 36%. So hopefully that makes sense.

 

Basically you’re making sure you’ve got all of your food costs captured and all of your sales captured.

 

Once you’ve got those figures, you’re going to divide the food cost by the net sales. And then when you get that figure, just multiply it by 100. That figure then is your food cost percentage. So in this instance for the figures that we just looked at on the previous sheet there, so on the P&L here.

 

So you can see with the takings there, all I’ve done is take out the interest income of $837 to give us the $701,000 of income. And in the row below you can see I’ve excluded the commission expense for the deliveries, so I’m just looking at the food costs for this purpose. So that’s where those figures have come from. Fairly straightforward calculation.

 

How to work out food cost percentage

 

Now, if you want to work out what the cost of goods are, which is obviously a very important metric as well, then in addition to the food costs you need to add things like packaging and Uber, any expenses for delivery partners or anything else. Any other costs associated with providing that product, that food to the end customer.

 

Calculate your food cost percentage

 

So at this point you’re not going to include things like wages, labour, rent, anything else like that. It’s purely the cost of the food, any packaging and any delivery costs associated with it. You take the same net sales figure and you do the same calculation, so you’re going to divide that figure by the net sales and that will then give you a cost of goods percentage.

 

So hopefully that all makes sense. If you do have any questions, feel free just to drop them in the comments below. Always happy to try and help out and make sense of this if I can for you. So feel free to let me know if there’s anything you’re not sure about. Good luck, and let me know how you get on.

Cafes For Sale in Sydney

Cafes For Sale in Sydney

GSE Business Consultants specialise in helping people to sell cafes across Sydney, Canberra,  Regional NSW and throughout Australia.

 

If you are looking to buy a cafe and would like further information about any of the businesses listed please register as a buyer and complete the Confidentiality Agreement. 

 

Once logged in you will be able to view financial information that is only visible to registered users. Once you have read through this information feel free to get in touch to request a full business profile which will show the full details and address of the business.

 

Please note that we do not send these details out without having a conversation with you first, its really important that we understand exactly what it is that you are looking for.

 

Many Cafes for Sale in Sydney that we work with are not listed on the website and, by gaining a clear understanding of your needs this will enable us to offer you opportunities that you may not otherwise have found.

 

If you are considering the sale of your cafe I would love the opportunity to meet with you and discuss your options. As you are probably aware there are hundreds of cafes for sale in Sydney at anyone time.

 

To secure the right deal you need to make sure you work with a specialist and with somebody who has been where you are and knows the business inside out.

 

If you have a cafe for sale in Sydney and would like to have a chat to talk about the best way forward and,  ensure that you sell for the right price and the right time give us a call on 1300 52 21 79.

 

We also have a Private Facebook Group for anyone thinking of selling their Cafe the group is called “Exit Planning For Cafe Owners”  this group is a community of cafe owners and industry professionals who are coming together to share the best tips, tricks and insights to selling cafes and restaurants without the struggle, and without paying thousands in commission!

Find the Exit Planning Group here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2124440880959192/?source_id=1648444935438475

 

Check Out the Top Cafes in Sydney 2018

Check out Sydney’s Top 20 Cafes of 2017

Cafes For Sale on the Northern Beaches Sydney

Cafes For Sale on the Northern Beaches Sydney

Cafes For Sale on The Northern Beaches Sydney

 

View more cafes for sale in Sydney Here

 

 

 

GSE specialise in helping cafe owners to sell their business at the right time and at the right price.

This page shows some of the Cafes For Sale on The Northern Beaches Sydney that we currently have listed. We also work with many cafe owners that prefer not to list their business on the internet so, if you are looking to buy a cafe in Sydney make sure that you register as a buyer with us.

Once registered you will be able to login to our website and view financial information about the businesses that we have listed, you will also receive advance notification about new businesses before they are officially listed.

 

 

 

Read news about Northern Beaches Cafes Here

Do I Need To Pay GST When I Sell My Cafe?

Do I Need To Pay GST When I Sell My Cafe?

 

 

 

Do I need to pay GST when I sell my Cafe?

 

The question about whether or not GST is payable on the sale of a cafe is something that seems to confuse many people and, it is certainly something that you should look into before you sell.

 

The short answer to this question is no (providing that you meet certain criteria outlined by the ATO).

 

The term used commonly in this ruling is “supply of a going concern” simply put this means that the business is still trading.

 

The ATO make it quite clear that if the business is being sold as a going concern then there will be no GST payable on the transaction.

 

What determines if a business is being sold as a going concern?

 

In order for the business sale to be deemed as a going concern then you must make sure that:

 

  • The business continues to operate up until and including the date of supply (settlement)
  • All of the equipment required to continue the operation is supplied as part of the sale.

 

Most cafe sales will fall into this category. An example of an exception might be a sale of fixtures and fittings in a shop which is no longer trading.

 

If you are selling your cafe as an operational business then the sale will most likely be considered “a going concern”.

 

What else needs to be considered to ensure you don’t have to pay GST on your sale?

 

In addition to making sure you are selling as a going concern you will need to make sure that both you and the person buying the business have agreed that the the business is being sold as a going concern.

 

This is generally taken care of in the contract of sale, this is quite a standard clause in most contacts and looks something like this:

 

By you both signing this contract you will have effectively agreed that the sale is as “a going concern”

 

The buyer must also be registered for GST

 

Whoever is buying your business must also be registered for GST in order for the transaction to be GST exempt.

 

If you can meet all of the criteria above then your sale will likely not include GST.

 

Where can I get more info?

 

You can read more about the ATO guidelines here

https://www.ato.gov.au/General/ATO-advice-and-guidance/In-detail/Private-rulings/Supporting-documents/GST/Sale-of-a-business-as-a-going-concern/

 

Details about the tax ruling can be found here

 

http://law.ato.gov.au/atolaw/view.htm?docid=GST/GSTR20025/NAT/ATO/00001

 

Speak to your accountant and double check your personal situation and if you are still not sure then the ATO are very helpful in explaining this.

Contact the ATO directly on 13 28 61

 

I hope this helps make the understanding of GST on cafe sales a bit clearer, if you need any help or advice feel free to get in touch at any time.

How to increase Cafe Profits - Menu Costings

How to increase Cafe Profits – Menu Costings

One of the biggest factors when working out the potential sale price of your café will be the profitability.

 

Whatever stage you are at whether you are on the market now or just wanting to make plans to sell further down the track then this is a good exercise to go through.

 

Periodically costing out your individual menu items and dishes puts your mind at rest that each item that you are selling is priced right and making the correct margin.

 

The process of going through your supplier invoices will also force you to check what you are paying for key ingredients and may help you pick up on price rises that you had not been aware of.

 

Costing out each item is also a good way to check current portion sizes and make sure that staff are all aware of correct amount of each ingredient that they should be using for each dish.

 

Being aware of you highest margin lines will also help you when it comes to knowing what you can offer as a promotion or special and which dishes you and your staff should be pushing the hardest.

 

This video shows how a simple spreadsheet like this can make the process quick and painless, it will also give you a reference to check back against when you make any changes to ingredients, suppliers or prices.

 

Don’t feel you need to cost out all of your dishes at once, just pace yourself and start with the highest selling lines.

 

If you have never done this or not done it for some time then I guarantee its going to be an eye opener!

 

I hope this helps, feel free to comment below or get in touch if you need any help.

 

Coffee Roasters on The Northern Beaches

Coffee Roasters on The Northern Beaches

 

 

This page is designed to showcase local Coffee Roasters on The Northern Beaches and North Shore to help buyers and cafe owners become more aware of the options available to them.

 

I have added this page as I am often asked for suggestions and recommendations from people buying cafes as well as existing operators who may be shopping around for a new bean or better deal.

 

The roasters listed on this page are all companies that either I have worked with directly or my clients  work with currently.

 

As with anything it pays to shop around when looking for a coffee supplier and, your decision to work with a particular roaster should be based on many different criteria.

 

It is quite likely that whoever you chose are going to become one of your biggest suppliers so you need to make sure that you feel that you can work long term with the roaster and that they will support you on an ongoing basis.

 

Whilst I am a great advocate for driving margins and reducing food costs wherever possible the price per kilo should be lower down your list of questions when speaking to roasters. In my opinion it is far more important to see how you will be able to work together to grow your business, after all the better you do the better they will do.

 

Many roasters will help you out with equipment, training and branding in return for agreeing to buy from them for a certain period of time, currently this seems to range from 1-3 years.

 

One of the best things I can suggest for you to do is to go and visit all of the roasters that you are considering. Meet with the owners, sales reps and roasters and get to know the company, decide whether they are the type of company that you can see yourself working with long term.

 

Once you have visited a few roasters and of course tasted more espresso than you thought possible then you can start thinking about price.

 

In most cases the price per kilo will not vary greatly between like for like roasters, you should really be motivated by taste of the coffee and your feel for the company when making your final decision.

 

As coffee is likely to be one of the mainstays of your business and your customers will vote with their feet if it is not good enough then opting for an inferior bean to save a couple of dollars per kilo will hurt the top line more than it will help the bottom line.

 

I hope this page helps you become more aware of some of the great Coffee Roasters on The Northern Beaches that you have to choose from, if you have any questions, comments or feedback please feel free to get in touch anytime.

 

Quattro Coffee Roasters

 

Coffee Roasters on The Northern Beaches

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2/3 Apollo St Warriewood NSW 2102

P: (02) 8919 2125

[email protected]
quattrocoffees.com

Quattro Coffee Roasters is all about the highest quality coffee sourced from around the World and Roasted in Australia. Time is spent on cupping to ensure just the right roast profile is applied so the coffee is just right for the best cup of coffee possible.

We are called Quattro because not only do we believe in the heritage of coffee we believe that there are 4 really important aspect to creating the perfect cup

– it starts with People critical at all stages

– then the Bean is selected direct from farms in the coffee belt

– the green bean is then Roasted with care and attention

– finally it’s down to the Brew, whether it’s a stove top, a Siphon or an Espresso machine get the grind right and brew away…

 

 

 

 

 9 Bar Coffee

Northern Beaches Coffee Roasters

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Factory Unit 6/4 Hayes Street Balgowlah NSW 2093

P: (02) 9949 3275

M: 0414 527 663

[email protected]

www.9BarCoffee.com

 

9Bar Coffee are a service company located in Sydney’s Northern Suburbs offering service for most makes of espresso coffee machines and  coffee grinders. 9Bar also trade new and used coffee equipment Australia Wide.

Jason Marks, owner operator of 9Bar Coffee has over 20 years experience within the coffee industry.

Jason’s passion for espresso coffee has led to the creation of a premium coffee brand 9Bar Coffee and more recently the revolutionary espresso machine espressoDECK .

Jason believes that proper training, fresh coffee and well-maintained espresso equipment improves your coffee standard, he sees it as a proven way to a better cup and increased coffee sales.

Feel free call or email Jason any time to see if  he can help you with your espresso coffee needs.

 

 

 

 

 

Little Italy Coffee Roasters

 

Northern Beaches Coffee Roasters

 

 

 

 

 

 

18/8 Tilley Lane, Frenchs Forest NSW 2086

P: (02) 9453 2009

[email protected]

www.licr.com.au

 

Little Italy Coffee Roasters was established since 2007 and since then they have built up a loyal following of wholesale customers.

Brothers Adam and Guy Bortz who run the business pride themselves on offering a bespoke roasting service tailored to their clients specific needs. Little Italy have move than 15 different blends available and, they also work with their customers to develop individual roasting profiles if required.

Many of the house blends that you see in Sydney cafes packaged with the cafe’s logo come from Little Italy’s purpose built facility on The Northern Beaches. In addition to personalising the coffee packaging Adam and Guy also offer bespoke printed cups which can either be co branded or printed with just the cafe’s logo.

A wide range of coffee machines and grinders are available as part of the supply agreement and different options can be put together to suit any budget.

Complimentary barista training of all levels is also available to customers either in store or at Little Italy’s premises in Frenchs Forest.

 

 

Background Coffee

 

Background Coffee are on of our featured Northern Beaches Coffee Roasters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shop 1/ 61 Middleton Rd
Cromer, NSW 2099
Telephone: 1300 44 26 33 (24 hours)
Email: [email protected]

https://backgroundcoffee.com.au/ 

 

The Background Coffee  journey began back in 2009 when Lecio (owner) set up his first café serving speciality coffee in Manly.

 

After successfully operating the business for 12 months Lecio decided to install a 2Kg top bench roaster inside the shop. The locals loved the flavours of the high quality speciality coffee and the café became a huge success.

 

From there the demand for Lecio to supply other cafes began to grow and in 2012 Background Coffee was established. Since then the wholesale business has grown significantly and is recognised as one of the leading roasters on the Northern Beaches.

 

Background take a wholistic approach with their clients and in addition to providing barista training and equipment maintenance Lecio and his wife Patricia also use their experience of buying and selling cafes to help owners improve profitability and systems in their cafes.

How to Increase the Value of a Café

How to Increase the Value of a Café

How to Increase the Value of a Café

 

In some ways selling a café is very different to selling other businesses but there are several ways in which you can add value to a café that are pretty much the same with most businesses.

 

So how can you increase the value of your café?

 

 

Reduce the Risk

One of the factors that will reduce the value of your café and also increase the time on the market is when buyers sense that there is some risk associated with the purchase.

 

Examples of this might be a short lease, a lease with a demolition clause, declining net profit and even a poorly maintained shop.

 

It’s a really good idea to start planning the sale of your business as early as possible, ideally your business should always be ready for sale but I appreciate that this is not always practical.

 

Negotiating a new lease or arranging an assignment can be a lengthy process so, before you commit to the sale process it is a good idea to meet with your solicitor to discuss any potential issues with either option.

 

With an incoming tenant most landlords and managing agents are going to want some proof that the person looking to purchase your business is going to make a good tenant. Make sure you understand exactly what your landlord will require to assess the purchaser and then make sure that the buyer is aware of this early on.

 

Another thing that worries some people is when they think that the business is too reliant on certain employees (barista, chef etc.) or even yourself. Anything you can do to reassure purchasers that you have a café which does not rely on one or more individuals is going to reduce risk and increase the  price.

 

This could be achieved by having a documented system in place for things like recruitment, training and operations. What you really want to aim for is to show that anyone could buy the business and follow your systems to keep it running the way it is currently.

 

 

 

Improve the Bottom Line

 

It seems basic to mention this but I often see businesses that have the opportunity to increase profit without making too many changes.

It’s tough when you get into the mindset of selling to stay focused on profit but a few small changes can often have an impact on the bottom line that can help to increase the value and saleability of the café.

 

Start with your biggest impact areas:

 

  • Wage costs – How is you wage cost percentage? Are there ways that you can tighten the rosters and save a few dollars here and there?

Can you cut back on a few casual hours?

 

  • Food costs – How is you Gross Profit percentage?

 

Along with wage costs supplier expenses are another major weekly outgoing for cafes and often an area to make quick improvements.

 

How does your gross margin compare to the industry average?

 

Are you confident that you have the best deal possible from your suppliers or can you negotiate some more discount?

 

Are you monitoring the food waste and stock control?

 

Are you confident that the margins are right for all of your dishes? When was the last time you checked?

 

 

Why Bother?

 

If your café is taking $10,000 per week and the food costs are 38% a reduction of just 2% could result in an extra $10,400 in annual profit which will in turn increase the value business, lower the risk and make you a few extra $$ whilst the business is on the market.

 

 

Drive the Top Line

 

One of the key metrics that buyers look at are the weekly sales of the café, it therefore makes sense to make sure you are doing all you can to maximise these, right? You would be surprised how many businesses I see that have stopped driving sales because they are on the market or the owner is thinking of selling.

 

Many buyers will see the lack of marketing such as social media posts, new menus and promotions as a sign that the owner has given up or is too busy with other commitments.

 

When I was buying cafes I was always pleased to see a neglected Facebook page or Instagram account as this signalled that I was more likely to get a deal.

 

Try and keep running the business like you just started it, keep the social media up to date and keep working on ways to bring in more business.

 

Focus on the only three ways to grow the business:

 

  1. Get more customers (advertising, social media etc)
  2. Sell more to your customers (would you like fries with that?)
  3. Sell more often to your customers (loyalty programs etc)

 

 

If you combine the impact of improving the margins mentioned above (wages and food cost) with an improved top line the impact can be very beneficial.

The value of the café is ultimately going to be determined by the net profit so the more you can do to improve the bottom line the higher the potential value will be.

 

I hope that this has helped you learn a little more about How to Increase the Value of a Café, you might also find this 20 point checklist useful.

 

If you have any questions about how to maximise the value of your café feel free to email me [email protected]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When did you last Google your Cafe?

When did you last Google your Cafe?

 
When selling your business it’s understandable and quite normal for your mindset to shift. When this happens your attention to detail can also change, managing your online and social presence can be one of the things that gets pushed to one side.
 

Even though you are considering selling or maybe already be on the market it’s really important that you stay on top of this and here is why.
 

Whenever we get a call from somebody about how they should go about selling their cafe one of the first things that we do is check out their online presence.
 
What we have noticed is that most buyers also seem to do exactly the same thing when they know a cafe is for sale. I find it quite easy to tell how somebody feels about their business just by looking at the type and frequency of posts on social media, the business information available online and recent reviews.
 

Think about it logically, if you come across a Facebook or Instagram account that has little or no recent posts, how to you think the owner is feeling about their business?
 

If you look through recent reviews and notice negative comments about service and products (especially unanswered comments) what kind if signal is this sending out about how engaged the owner is?
 

Many people trust the information delivered by Google about your business and unless you check it and update it it could be sending out the wrong message to buyers.
 

There are typically two main types of buyers that will be looking at buying your cafe and here is how they will see these problems differently.
 
 

The Buyer With No Previous Industry Experience.

 
When a buyer without any hospitality experience comes across a business with negative unanswered reviews or a lack of social media activity they tend to be concerned that the business is not a good option.

In the mind of this buyer they may be concerned about dealing with reviews about the product and service when they may not have as much experience as some of the staff that are currently employed.

This type of buyer is looking for a strong ready made business that they are going to get a good return from and will allow them to move into the hospitality industry in the smoothest way possible.

There is a strong upside to these buyers paying top dollar for a good business, demonstrating that they are taking over a well established and low risk business will lead to you getting a much better offer and quicker sale.
By maintaining a strong online presence during the sale process you are going to make your business look like a more attractive and lower risk opportunity to these buyers.
 
 

The Experienced Operator.

 
This buyer is somebody that recognises that turning an underperforming business around is going to be harder than starting from scratch.

Fighting against a negative reputation can be a lot of work so continuing to manage your online reviews and keeping your online presence in check will help to reduce the risk in the eyes of these buyers.

The experienced operator will be able to see the potential (for them) of your business in a clearer way than the person who is coming into the industry from elsewhere. With that in mind they will potentially pay a good price for your business if everything stacks up.

If these buyers find one or two things that seem like a red flag then they typically negotiate much harder than other buyers.

Because experienced operators know the work involved in running a cafe they are usually less emotionally engaged as the first timer who has always dreamt of owning a cafe. With this in mind it is crucial that you don’t give them any wriggle room to try and drop the price or walk away.

The Upside to staying on top of your online presence during the sale.

  • You increase the appeal of the cafe to both types of buyer.
  • The perceived risk to buyers is reduced.
  • You will most likely bring in extra sales by posting regularly on your social media platforms.
  • You are putting out the image that you are fully engaged and not in a hurry to sell, even if that’s not the case!
  • You are adding to the goodwill of the business and giving yourself more positives to discuss with potential buyers.
  • The process of posting more frequently on social media may even help potential buyers to become aware of your cafe for the first time.
  • If the Increased activity on social media increases business this will help the cafe present better when you have buyers looking at it.

Action Steps

  • Google your business and check the first 10 results, is everything that you find up to date?
  • Check your Google Business listing, is this information correct?
  • Try and post on your social media platforms at least once a week. (we want people to almost find it hard to believe that you are for sale).
  • Check your online reviews and respond professionally to all of them. Don’t get emotionally drawn into any negative reviews, take a deep breath or sleep on it and post a response explaining your side and apologise if you got it wrong.

 
As hard as it is, when selling your business you need to keep running it as if you’re not selling.

If you can ramp up your marketing and online activity you are going to make the business look more appealing from the outside and as mentioned above make a bit of extra cash on the way out.

I hope this encourages you to review your current online presence and to take some action that may be needed. As always if you have any questions about preparing your cafe for sale or the sale process feel free to get in touch.