How to Apportion Goodwill, Fixtures and Fittings

How to Apportion Goodwill, Fixtures and Fittings

 

 

The split between goodwill fixtures and fittings is something that will be agreed as part of your sale negotiation, knowing your tax position and what will suit you best is going give you the best chance of getting the terms that you want.

If you have this figure worked out before you agree the sale then you can make sure that your solicitor adds this figure to the first draft of the contract.

In this video from our Six Steps to Sale Program I break down what the apportionment is and how to go about working out what yours should be.

 

 

How to Apportion Goodwill, Fixtures and Fittings

Video Transcript

Let’s talk about how to apportion Goodwill, Fixtures and Fittings when selling your cafe. Now, if this is a term you’re not familiar with, don’t worry. I’m going to go through and break down exactly what it is and what you need to do.

 

 

The apportionment of goodwill, fixtures and fittings is, basically, it’s a split between the value or the sale price of the business. It’s going to be broken into two parts, so, firstly, all the plant, fixtures and fittings, so that’s all of your kitchen equipment, all of the inventory, furniture and all that sort of thing, that forms one part of it and then, on the other side, it’s the goodwill that’s being applied to the business’ sale price.

 

 

It’s really good to be on the front foot with this and make sure that that you’ve taken some advice early on so that you know what your tax position is and what split your accountant suggests is going to benefit you most. It will always form part of the contract of sale, and it’s going to be the figure that’s used for tax purposes for you and for the purchaser. Its a really good idea as I mentioned just to make sure that you know what your tax position is and what your accountant suggests that you should do in regards to that split, so all you need to really worry about at this point is taking some advice, so talk to your accountant and make sure that you find out what they suggest about that split. It’s going to depend on your personal and business tax situation.

 

 

Now, normally speaking, when you’re the seller of the business, it’s going to be in your interest for that split to be higher on the goodwill side, and for the person purchasing, it’s usually better for them to have it higher on the fixtures and fittings so that they can then write down the depreciation at a higher level, so do take some advice on that. It’s not a one-thing-fits-all. It’s going to be very specific to your business and your personal tax situation, so make sure, as part of that, it’s on the checklist there for what you should discuss with your accountant, but make sure that that’s a figure that you’re aware of.

 

 

Make sure that when you do get to the contract stage of your sale that you’re going to advise your solicitor this early on, so it’s a great idea to put this into the first draft of the contract. Sometimes, this won’t even be questioned by the purchaser, so, as mentioned, good idea, be on the front foot, be proactive, make sure that you know what’s going to suit you best.

 

 

Having said that, you need to be prepared to negotiate. It is usually something that a savvy buyer with a good accountant and a good solicitor is going to probably pick up on what you’ve put in there and realise that that’s not to the best advantage of their client, the purchaser, so you may well need to negotiate on that, so be prepared to do that.

 

 

That’s a very brief look what the split between goodwill and fixtures and fittings is. It’s nothing that that you need to be too concerned about, but it’s something that you should be taking some professional advice on from your accountant just to make sure that you’re fully prepared and, when you do get to that stage, as I said, make sure that you communicate that split that you’re aiming for with your solicitor and get in the first draft of the contract early on. You may find there’s no negotiation about that at all and it’s accepted on your terms, which, obviously, for your tax purposes is going to be perfect.

 

 

Hopefully that all made sense. If you’ve got any questions, as always, get in touch in the usual channels, let me know. I’m more than happy to answer any queries you might have about this.

 

 

 

How to Calculate Your Food Cost Percentage

How to Calculate Your Food Cost Percentage

 

 

 

 

Video Transcript.

 

Following on from the menu costing spreadsheet that we sent out recently or you may have downloaded with regard to working out what your food cost percentage is, I’ve had a couple of questions from people about asking “how can we work out what our current food cost percentage is based off the P&L?”

 

So in this quick video I’m going to walk you through a very easy calculation to work out where your current food cost percentage is, and show you how you can then take that and work out what your current cost of goods is as well.

 

Two fairly important metrics that you should be looking at all the time, although there are quicker ways of doing it than going through the P&L, this is a good way of looking at it.

 

The thing to bear in mind with this is if there’s cash coming out of the business, you need to have a record of that. You need to know how much has come out in order to add it back into the figures that you’re taking from the P&L to give you a true figure. So if you don’t have a record of that, I suggest you start keeping one or keep track of it so you can really have a clear idea of exactly how the business is doing. Otherwise you’re kind of flying blind.

 

We do have another spreadsheet that we use for that so if that’s something that’s of interest to you, just post in the comments below and we’ll make sure that we get one of those out to you. And there is a video accompanying that as well, just to walk you through how you can track all of the expenses and all of the income, cash and otherwise, to make sure you know exactly where your cafe’s at at any one time with those key metrics.

 

 

So moving on then, looking at the food cost percentage from the P&L perspective. For the purpose of this we’re going to be using this column here, so the actual June 18 column. And down here, what we’re going to do basically is we’re going to go through and from this, to start with, we’re going to be looking at what was the income?

 

What’s the net income for the business for the period that we’re looking at? So we’re going to take every line here, so the main sales line here. In addition to those you can see on this particular P&L there’s income from Uber and Menulog and so on, so we’re going to include that. We’re going to add all of those up.

 

 

Once we’ve done that, we’re going to look at what was the food cost in relation to generating those sales. And you can see there, in the cost of sales column there, we’ve got cost of goods, food combined, and also cost of goods sold. So that doesn’t necessarily need to be on two lines. It’s just the way that these people have decided to run things through for their accounting purposes. But it could all be under one line.

 

 

Basically what you’re looking for here is what were the food costs involved in generating the income in the top line. So once you’ve got those numbers, it’s just really a case of taking that number.

 

How to Calculate Food Cost Percentage

 

So to work out what the total food costs were and then you’re going to divide that by the net sales, what the total net sales were, and that was from both of those rows previously. That will give you a percentage figure or a figure here of 0.3567. You then multiply that by 100. It’ll give you 35.67. And that will then show you that your food cost is at 36%. So hopefully that makes sense.

 

Basically you’re making sure you’ve got all of your food costs captured and all of your sales captured.

 

Once you’ve got those figures, you’re going to divide the food cost by the net sales. And then when you get that figure, just multiply it by 100. That figure then is your food cost percentage. So in this instance for the figures that we just looked at on the previous sheet there, so on the P&L here.

 

So you can see with the takings there, all I’ve done is take out the interest income of $837 to give us the $701,000 of income. And in the row below you can see I’ve excluded the commission expense for the deliveries, so I’m just looking at the food costs for this purpose. So that’s where those figures have come from. Fairly straightforward calculation.

 

How to work out food cost percentage

 

Now, if you want to work out what the cost of goods are, which is obviously a very important metric as well, then in addition to the food costs you need to add things like packaging and Uber, any expenses for delivery partners or anything else. Any other costs associated with providing that product, that food to the end customer.

 

Calculate your food cost percentage

 

So at this point you’re not going to include things like wages, labour, rent, anything else like that. It’s purely the cost of the food, any packaging and any delivery costs associated with it. You take the same net sales figure and you do the same calculation, so you’re going to divide that figure by the net sales and that will then give you a cost of goods percentage.

 

So hopefully that all makes sense. If you do have any questions, feel free just to drop them in the comments below. Always happy to try and help out and make sense of this if I can for you. So feel free to let me know if there’s anything you’re not sure about. Good luck, and let me know how you get on.

How to increase Cafe Profits - Menu Costings

How to increase Cafe Profits – Menu Costings

One of the biggest factors when working out the potential sale price of your café will be the profitability.

 

Whatever stage you are at whether you are on the market now or just wanting to make plans to sell further down the track then this is a good exercise to go through.

 

Periodically costing out your individual menu items and dishes puts your mind at rest that each item that you are selling is priced right and making the correct margin.

 

The process of going through your supplier invoices will also force you to check what you are paying for key ingredients and may help you pick up on price rises that you had not been aware of.

 

Costing out each item is also a good way to check current portion sizes and make sure that staff are all aware of correct amount of each ingredient that they should be using for each dish.

 

Being aware of you highest margin lines will also help you when it comes to knowing what you can offer as a promotion or special and which dishes you and your staff should be pushing the hardest.

 

This video shows how a simple spreadsheet like this can make the process quick and painless, it will also give you a reference to check back against when you make any changes to ingredients, suppliers or prices.

 

Don’t feel you need to cost out all of your dishes at once, just pace yourself and start with the highest selling lines.

 

If you have never done this or not done it for some time then I guarantee its going to be an eye opener!

 

I hope this helps, feel free to comment below or get in touch if you need any help.